Nearsightedness

How are you with road signs or movie screens? What about newspapers and labels?

Nearsightedness

If you can see objects nearby with no problems, but reading road signs or making out the writing on the board at school is more difficult, you may be nearsighted. Your eye care professional may refer to the condition as myopia.

 

Myopia is not a disease, it is an eye disorder, but that does not mean that you have “bad eyes”. It refers to a condition wherein the focusing power of the eye is too high in proportion to the length of the eyeball. This is typically treated with corrective lenses.

 

Speak to your eye care professional to learn more.

Farsightedness

Trouble reading things close up but fine with reading at a distance? Does reading a book give you a headache?

Farsightedness

If so, you may be farsighted or have an eye condition known as hyperopia. Farsightedness can cause the eyes to exert extra effort to see close up. Symptoms may vary depending on the amount of hyperopia. After viewing nearby objects for an extended period, blurred vision, headaches and eyestrain may occur. Other vision disorders can also contribute to these symptoms. Consult your eye care professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

 

Farsightedness isn’t a disease, nor does it mean that you have "bad eyes". It refers to a mismatch in the focusing power of your eyes in comparison to the length of your eyeball. The degree of variation will determine whether or not you will need corrective lenses.

 

Speak to your eye care professional to learn more.

Astigmatism

Blurry vision no matter where you look, close-up or far-away?

Astigmatism

If your answer is yes, you may have astigmatism. It sounds like a scary word but actually having astigmatism is a pretty common condition; it’s not a disease and it doesn’t mean you have “bad eyes”. Astigmatism usually occurs when the front surface of the eye (the cornea) or the lens inside the eye has an irregular curvature, causing the light rays to focus unevenly on the back of the eye (retina). This difference in shape affects the ability to focus, which can result in blurry vision. This means you may have had difficulty wearing the standard sphere contact lenses and instead would require a toric lens, specifically designed for those with astigmatism.

 

Speak to your eye care professional to learn more.

Presbyopia

When you pick up a menu, do you have to move it away from you in order to see the text? Have you come to the point where your arm isn’t long enough for that trick to work anymore?

Presbyopia

The above scenario is a common telltale symptom of presbyopia. Unfortunately, as we get older, the lenses in our eyes lose some of their elasticity, and with this they lose some of their ability to change focus for different distances. The loss is gradual. Long before we become aware that seeing close up is becoming more difficult, the lenses in our eyes have begun losing their ability to change shape to help focus light rays. Only when the loss of elasticity impairs our vision to a noticeable degree do we recognise the change.

*Based on wearers agreeing with the statement, “while wearing my lenses, I sometimes forget I have them on”.